Thursday, April 10, 2014

We All Hate to Lose!

One of the thoughts in the book The Abs Diet was that diets fail because we are not programmed to lose. We hate to lose...at any thing! The book (and the philosophy) focused on the things we gain from being healthy--like visible abs!

Maybe there is something to this way of thinking.

I am still hearing of friends on different "diets" and their struggles to stick with the regiment of whatever diet they're using. And then I think the real failures occur when people reach their goals and go "off of the diet." Once back to their old habits, the weight slowly returns.

Rather rehash old material, I'll refer you to a previous post that describes "diet" as a way of living.
This "way of living" thing is really what I've done and feel that it is sustainable. As a matter of fact, although I am closely monitoring my weight loss, I am really past "trying to lose weight" as a goal and more interested in what weight this "way of living" will place me. I'm beginning to realize that I'll probably wind up at a weight that is lower than my original goal. Of course, when I started this journey I was still thinking in terms of "going on a diet!"

I'm currently consuming between 2,000 and 2,500 calories per day. Some days it's more; it's rarely less. It's almost always over the amount allowed on the app I use, but who cares? For me, it's more about eating good foods in reasonable amounts than about restrictions. Admittedly, if I'm going over by too much, I add a little exercise to offset the additional intake.

Even though the weight is coming off much more slowly now, I'll still make my original goal of 52 lbs. in 52 weeks. That will put me at 206 lbs by June 1. Right now I have two consecutive days below 210, so I'm only a few pounds away. I'm now guessing that I'll end up around 200, maybe a little less.

So, what have I gained?
I feel better.
And I feel better about myself.
I can easily manage the stairs to the tower (120), a long walk or a short run, an all day hike with backpacks, or an hour long bike ride.
A year ago, I could only manage a few push-ups and no pull-ups. Now I can do multiple sets of 25 push-ups and can manage a few pull-ups.
My sleep apnea isn't an issue most of the time. Although I feel okay without the CPAP machine, I am still using it because it's easier than going through the FAA's circus to keep my medical certification for one more year. I'm also sleeping more than I used to.
I have more energy than I remember having.
I am seldom "hungry" which helps avoid snacking on poor foods.
I've learned a lot about foods and how they affect me--my energy, my sleep, my mood, my weight, etc.

I would tell you that it's been difficult...except that it hasn't.
The most difficult thing that I had to do was simply to decide that I was going to make some changes in my "way of living."
I began to make decisions based on good health. I've had some good encouragers. I had to learn a little patience. I've had a few setbacks, and a few re-starts.

With most of us being a little (or a lot) overweight, and most of us making poor health decisions, we can all use a little encouragement. You'll feel better. You'll live longer. You'll spend less on healthcare and less time feeling like you need some health care.

Eat an apple.
Be well.

John <><

3 comments:

eViL pOp TaRt said...

John, you have make remarkable progress in the past year, and it is a total change in lifestyle. I am so happy for you!

John Hill said...

Thank you, Angel!

Mike said...

My gastro doc says no apples for me.